Resources

Growing a Movement

This report provides an overview of the Healthy Kids, Healthy Communities national program, which supported 49 partnerships to increase children’s access to healthy food and opportunities for physical activity through changes in policies, systems, and environments in communities at greatest risk for childhood obesity based on race, ethnicity, income, and geographic location. Growing a Movement includes common themes, key findings and brief vignettes, along with implications for the field that are valuable for local leaders, partners and funders alike.

View the full PDF of Growing a Movement.


Infographic

This infographic provides a high-level overview of the grantees’ collective work.

View the full infographic.


Program Results Report: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Transtria LLC (St. Louis) and the Institute for Public Health at Washington University in St. Louis evaluated Healthy Kids, Healthy Communities. Transtria’s CEO, Laura K. Brennan, PhD, MPH, led the evaluation team.

View the full report.


Journal of Public Health Management: Healthy Kids, Healthy Communities Evaluation Issue

The Journal of Public Health Management and Practice just released a supplement highlighting evaluation insights and successes of the Healthy Kids, Healthy Communities National Program. A special thanks goes to Transtria, the evaluation lead.

Click here to read the full supplement.


Videos


Leadership Profiles

This document showcases 30 of the dozens of dedicated HKHC leaders who have helped strengthen relationships, transform environments and change the norms of their communities. I would like to personally thank each one of them for bringing their true selves to these interviews and for allowing their personal stories to be shared with others.

Read the summary and view the full document.


Healthy Communities: The Building Blocks of a Culture of Health

What do Corvallis, Ore.; Baldwin Park, Calif.; and Buffalo, N.Y. have in common? It certainly isn’t their weather.

Hint—the commonality is something much more relevant to RWJF’s newly refined mission. These three cities are building a Culture of Health for all their citizens. They are tapping into the skills and resources of a diverse group of partners to ensure everyone has access to healthy choices. It’s their collective efforts, along with dozens of other communities supported by the Foundation’s Healthy Kids, Healthy Communities (HKHC) program, that make me so optimistic about our organizational goal.

This Robert Wood Johnson Foundation blog bridges the work of Healthy Kids, Healthy Communities to the Culture of Health movement.

Read the full blog.